Large Format Portrait Tent on Ridley Road Market, Dalston

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For London Pinhole Festival, London Alternative Photography Collective and Doomed Gallery asked Double Negative Darkroom to create a Large Format Portrait Booth on Ridley Road Market in Dalston. Here are the results!
Article in Loving Dalston.

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Simultaneous Pinhole Exposures, Ridley Road, Dalston, Worldwide Pinhole Day, 27 April 2014.

Douglas Nicolson's Bike Trailer Pinhole Camera.

Douglas Nicolson’s Bike Trailer Pinhole Camera.

Pinhole of Doomed Gallery, Douglas Nicolson

Pinhole of Doomed Gallery, Douglas Nicolson. 1.5 Hour Exposure With Bike Trailer.

Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

Daniel Berrange - Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

Daniel Berrange – Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

Sheila McKinney // Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

Sheila McKinney – Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

Multiple Pinhole Camera Exposures

London Pinhole Festival, Curated Exhibition

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A sneak preview of our curated exhibition, opening Friday 25th April 2014, 7pm at Doomed Gallery Dalston. Find out more about our schedule for London Pinhole Festival on our ABOUT PAGE.

Confirmed Exhibiting Artists:

ANTHONY CARR
BECKY RAMOTOWSKI
BEOWULF MAYFIELD
DIEGO LOPEZ CALVIN
DOUGLAS NICOLSON
EVA LIS
GRAHAM PATTERSON
JOHN FURLONG
MARCIN WOJCIECHOWSKI
NIGEL BREADMAN
SEBNEM UGURAL
SHEILA MCKINNEY
TIMOTHY BENNETT
WILLIAM ARNOLD
GRAHAM PATTERSON
CONSTANZA ISAZA MARTINEZ
ANDRES PANTOJA
KY LEWIS
MIKE CRAWFORD

Interview // Douglas Nicolson

We interviewed artist Douglas Nicolson, asking about his work with pinhole photography and other alternative photography processes.
Douglas is Artist In Residence at The Double Negative Darkroom in Hackney.

Why/when did you begin to get involved in pinhole photography?

At art school I had played around with pinhole but it was a couple of years ago when I was staying in Mocambique that I picked it up again. I found a supplier of black and white chemicals in Maputo so thought it was a good opportunity to experiment with pinhole as I didn’t have an enlarger.

Douglas Nicolson - Pinhole - Igreja De Santo Antonio Da Polana, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson – Pinhole – Igreja De Santo Antonio Da Polana, Maputo, Mocambique

I showed some work at a photography night that the Franco Mocambique Centre was running in maputo. this led to a gallery exhibition and running pinhole photography classes at the Mocambique Art School and partnering with Escola Melhor, a local NGO and the primary school they support.

Douglas Nicolson- Setting up a darkroom and wet area in the staff room of primary school, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson- Setting up a darkroom and wet area in the staff room of primary school, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson - Contact printing frame with defused and red light. Art School, Maputo, Mocambique.

Douglas Nicolson – Contact printing frame with defused and red light. Art School, Maputo, Mocambique.

Douglas Nicolson - Making shoe box pinholes with shutters, Art School, Maputo, Mocambique.

Douglas Nicolson – Making shoe box pinholes with shutters, Art School, Maputo, Mocambique.

Douglas Nicolson - Wet area and shoe box pinholes with shutters in background, Art School, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson – Wet area and shoe box pinholes with shutters in background, Art School, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson - Getting ready to make photograms with beach finds. primary school, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson – Getting ready to make photograms with beach finds. primary school, Maputo, Mocambique

I like the DIY aspect of pinhole. To make a positive print, I used a piece of white shampoo bottle to diffuse a 15w bulb in a gaffer-taped cardboard box with another bulb painted red to use as a safe light. It was difficult to find darkroom equipment locally, so I had to make my own!

Douglas Nicolson - Pinhole - Participants photogram image of beach finds

Douglas Nicolson – Pinhole – Participants photogram image of beach finds

Douglas Nicolson - Participant Pinhole Image

Douglas Nicolson – Participant Pinhole Image


What kind of pinhole camera do you use?

I wanted to make something a little more portable with the ability to take multiple images to enlarge from, so I made a pinhole camera that can take and wind 35mm film. I have often used colour film with this camera.

Douglas Nicolson - 35mm RollFilm Pinhole Camera

Douglas Nicolson – 35mm RollFilm Pinhole Camera

Douglas Nicolson - Pinhole Portrait on 35mm, Interior, 2 Hours

Douglas Nicolson – Pinhole Portrait on 35mm, Interior, 2 Hours


Do you practice any other alternative photography processes?

I got into alt printing process through experiments with the cyanotype process and have attempted platinum and carbon.

Douglas Nicolson - Cyanotype printing booth in a market stall

Douglas Nicolson – Cyanotype printing booth in a market stall

At present I mainly shoot Wet Plate Collodion and either show the plates or take contact prints from them. I thought wet plate would be a good way to get back in to taking portraits again. I enjoy the slowness of the process and the randomness of the people I meet when I take out my bicycle trailer wet-plate darkroom.

Douglas Nicolson - Bicycle trailer wet plate darkroom

Douglas Nicolson – Bicycle trailer wet plate darkroom

Douglas Nicolson, Wet plate collodion –  Amy the Sheep and handler Roger. Dalston Eastern  Curve Garden, London

Douglas Nicolson, Wet plate collodion – Amy the Sheep and handler Roger. Dalston Eastern Curve Garden, London

If I’m making enlargements I like the quality that lith developing brings to the final print.

Could you say more about the piece; Indian Ocean, Mocambique?

I work with a lot of different community groups and often I give the camera to workshop participants to represent themselves. At the time, I was reading a lot about the ethics of representation so I was having a bit of an ethical dilemma towards taking photographs of people.
Because of this, I chose to point my camera outwards, towards the wonderful coastline. I became fascinated by the motion of the water over time and the amazing light in Mocambique.

Douglas Nicolson, Pinhole - Indian Ocean, Mozambique

Douglas Nicolson, Pinhole – Indian Ocean, Mozambique

Douglas Nicolson - Pinhole - Fishing boats, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson – Pinhole – Fishing boats, Maputo, Mocambique

Douglas Nicolson - Pinhole - Cape Of Good Hope, South Africa

Douglas Nicolson – Pinhole – Cape Of Good Hope, South Africa


Is the material nature of the analogue process something that is significant within your work?

I enjoy tinkering and the craftsmanship involved when you begin to make your own cameras and experiment with chemicals. The act of making an image becomes a significant and enjoyable part of the process for me. The materiality of the substance is not a main concern in the final work, although it is often present.

Pinhole Photographs // Diego López Calvín

Diego López Calvín - Victoria Embankment

Diego López Calvín – Victoria Embankment

Diego López Calvín - Tower of London

Diego López Calvín – Tower of London

Diego López Calvín - London Eye from La Hispaniola

Diego López Calvín – London Eye from La Hispaniola

Diego López Calvín - Big Ben Skyline

Diego López Calvín – Big Ben Skyline

Diego López Calvín - Bank

Diego López Calvín – Bank

Solargraphy, also called Solarigraphy, is a photographic technique developed in 1999 by photographers Slawomir Decyk, Diego López Calvín and Pawel Kula in the city of Szczecin (Poland), as a mean to observe and record solar trajectories at different times of the year and from different latitudes of the planet, in what they called “Solaris Project” 2000-2002. In this project, a group of Spanish and Polish photographers were involved by simultaneously registering the sun-paths from the northern European latitudes to the equatorial line in Uganda.

Solarigraphs or Solargraphs are images obtained by pinhole cameras loaded with black and white photo-sensitive paper and given long-term exposures of days, weeks, months or years. In that period, the Sun’s trajectory leaves a linear imprint, which records its trajectory through the day and its different positions throughout the year, while cloudy days leave no imprint on the photo paper at all. This technique does not need any chemical process or water as the picture appears by direct darkening. Solargraphy works in a similar way to such processes as the Salt papers, Gums, Cyanotype, Platinotype or modern papers P.O.P. (printed out papers). Solargraphs are not developed and not fixed because the same light that creates the negative can destroy it. For this reason, the negatives should be kept safe from light. The photographic paper has to be scanned or reproduced and later on processed by any kind of image software treatment in order to share the positive. The Sun is a clock that invites us to reflect on the relation between space and time.

Everything moves very quickly and we miss details that would demand more time to be perceived. With this technique we discover a way of seeing things that cannot be seen through our bare eyes. This is a vision that erases any movement, a technique that yields the image of a naked landscape, as if seen through the eyes of the threes or stones. Solarigraphs are part of the images that offer the opportunity to experiment on the characteristics and the limits of systems that claim to be representing and explaining reality.

In the last ten years, Diego López Calvín has travelled to different latitudes of the earth to experiment with photosensitive materials, solargraphy and long-term exposures, connecting places with the Sun’s slow-motion paths left on the image. He has placed cameras from the Arctic Circle to Ecuador through countries like France, Britain, Italy, USA, Poland, Greece, Egypt, Palestine, Uganda, Norway, Mexico, Colombia, Myanmar, Finland, Irak or Nepal and shared the results through his website and social networks. He has produced various actions and projects that relate photography, anthropology and astronomy. Diego and Sławomir Decyk were the curators of “Time in a Can” Solarigraphy Project 2011, where 40 pinhole photographers from both hemispheres were doing simultaneous solargraphs. He is running an installation called “Solargraphy Internet Protocol” in Almería (Spain), where he monitors the Earth’s rotation with a system consisting of a server, a camera obscura and photosensitive paper.

SOLARIGRAFIA